Dental Implants – What Determines Success and Failure

Patients are presented with dental implants as perfect or near-perfect replacements to their missing teeth. They are rarely informed about the risks and advised on the failure rates. The trials may have serious implications and are not flawless. Implants will fail, and they do. Patients must be fully informed of the risks and understand that dental implants may fail. Implant placement is very reliable and secure with careful preparation, which provides a stable which esthetic outcome for patients. Have a look at Veneers in Louisville for more info on this.

Dental implants came in the 1950’s a long time after their inception. Technology for dental implants shifts at an extremely quick rate. As each new technology is adapted, the quality of the dental implants typically improves. Occasionally a technology that is mostly great marketing enters the marketplace and either doesn’t improve the success or actually hinders it. Luckily this is not happening very much.

So what’s causing implants to fail? A number of factors result in an increased risk of dental implant failure. Unfortunately some of the risks can not be avoided and that is why dental implants are approximately 90-95 percent successful based on different studies (the number is actually closer to 95 per cent). As with long bone fractures, some fractures are simply not healed when the cast is removed, even with the best approximation of the fracture and great immobility. Either a non-union occurs (that means no healing has ever really begun), or a fibrous union occurs (where you have scar tissue instead of bone between the two sides of the fracture). Non-union and fibrous unions occur around 5 percent of the time, depending on the type and where the fracture is and the patient. That is similar to dental implant failure rates.

The same principles of fracture healing are in keeping with an implant ‘s healing. You need good bone approximation to the surface of the implant, and a time of immobility to successfully incorporate the implant into the osseo. Osseointegration means the implant is approved by the bone and inserted around the implant. As you can see, implant failure rate is similar to that of fractures that do not heal properly. Bone failure will occur to osseointegrate (similar to non-union) and you get a fibrous encapsulation (similar to the fibrous union in bone fractures) instead of bone around an implant.

However, certain conditions that increase the risk of implant failure are poorly controlled diabetes, some bone metabolic and congenital disorders, certain medications such as glucocorticoids (prednisone), immunosupressants, and bisphosphonate medications (Zometa, Fosamax, Actonel, Boniva, etc.) Additionally, smoking and poor hygiene habits can lead to increased risk of implant failure. People with these disorders and/or on these medications should bring their implant surgeon to their attention so they can tailor a treatment plan to suit their needs and their medical conditions.